Domino – Exchange On Premises Migration Pt1: Migration Tools

It’s been an interesting few months intermittently working on a project to move Notes and Domino users onto Exchange on premises 2013 and Outlook 2013.  I’m going to do a follow up blog talking about Outlook and Exchange behaviour compared to Notes and Domino but let’s start at the beginning, with planning a migration.

The first thing to know is that if your company uses Domino for mail, Exchange on premises is a step down.  I’m sorry but it is and I say this as someone with a lot of experience of both environments (albeit a LOT more in Domino). At the very least you need to allow for the administrative overhead to be larger and to encompass more of your environment. Domino is just Domino on a variety of platforms, Exchange is Active Directory and DNS and networking and a lot more besides.  In fact Microsoft seem to be focusing on making the on premises solution ever more restrictive and difficult to manage (better hope you enjoy Powershell) to encourage you to move to O365.

To give you an example, during the migration we had an issue where mail would suddenly stop sending outbound.  The logs gave no clue, I spent 2 days on it finding nothing and eventually decided to pay Microsoft to troubleshoot with me to find out what I’d done wrong.  5 hrs of joint working later we found it.  It wasn’t Exchange or any box I worked on.  It was one of the Domain Controllers that didn’t have a service running on it (kerberos key distribution center) that was causing the issue.  Started that service on that box and all was fine.  Three days wasted but at least it wasn’t what I did 🙂

MIGRATION TOOLS

First of all we need a migration tool unless you’re one of the increasingly large number of companies who just decide to start clean.  This is especially true when moving to O365 because there often isn’t either the option or the capability to upload terabytes or even gigabytes of existing mail to the cloud.  Having tested 5 different tools for this current project here were my biggest problems:

  1. A tool that was overly complex to install, outdated (requiring a Windows 7 OS) and the supplier wanted several thousand dollars to train me on how to install it
  2. Tools that didn’t migrate the data quiitteee right. It looked good at first glance but on digging deeper there were misfiled messages and calendar entries missing
  3. Tools that took an unfeasibly long time (>12hrs per mail file or even days).  The answer to that problem was offered as “you are migrating too much, we never do that” or “you need a battalian of workstations to do the migration”
  4. Tools that required me to migrate everything via their cloud service i.e send every message through their servers¨. I mean it works and requires little configuration but no.  Just no.

Whatever tool you decide to use I would recommend testing fully against one of your largest mail files and calculating the time taken against what that does to your project plan.  For my current smaller project I am using a more interactive tool that installed on a workstation and didn’t require any changes on either the Domino or Exchange end.

You’ll notice I’m not naming the tools here.  Although there are a couple where the supplier was so arrogant and unhelpful I’d like to name them, there are also several who were incredibly helpful and just not the right fit for this project.  Maybe for the next.  The right migration tool for you is the one that does the work you need in the time you need and has the right support team behind it to answer finicky questions like ‘what happened to my meeting on 3rd June 2015 which hasn’t migrated”.  Test. Test. Test.

Many of the migration tools are very cheap but be careful that some of the cheapest aren’t making their money off consultancy fees if paying them is the only way to make the product work.

QUESTIONS

So our first question is

“What do you want to migrate?”

Now the answer to this will initially often be “everything” but that means time and cost and getting Exchange to handle much larger mailboxes than it is happy to do.  That 30GB Domino mailfile won’t be appreciated by Exchange so the second question is

“Would you consider having archives for older data and new mailboxes for new”

You also need to ask about rooms and resources and shared mailboxes as well as consider how you are going to migrate contacts and if there needs to be a shared address book.  The migration of mail may be the easiest component of what you are planning.

Now we need to talk about coexistence.  Unless you plan to cutover during a single period of downtime during which no mail is available you will need a migration tool that can handle coexistence with people gradually moving to Exchange and still able to work with those not yet migrated from Domino without any barrier in between.  Coexistence is a lot more complex than migration and the migration tools that offer it require considerably more configuration and management for coexistence than they do for the migration.  Consider as well that your coexistence period could be months or even years.

One option, if the company is small enough, is to migrate the data and then plan a cutover period where you do an incremental update.  Updating the data every week incrementally allows you to cutover fairly quickly and also gives a nice clean rollback position.

EXCHANGE CONFIGURATION

The biggest issue in migrating from Domino to Exchange is how long it takes getting the data from point A to point B.  I tried a variety of migration tools and a 7GB mail file took anywhere from 3hrs to 17hrs to complete.  Now multiply that up.   Ensuring your Domino servers, migration workstations and Exchange servers are located on the same fast network is key.

Make sure your Exchange server is configured not to throttle traffic (because it will see that flood of migration data as needing throttling) so configure a disabled/unlimited throttling policy you can apply during the migration.

Exchange’s malware filter, which is installed by default and only has options for deleting messages or deleting their attachments, is not your friend during a migration.  Not only will it delete your Domino mail that it decides could be malware as it migrates but it also slows the actual migration down to a crawl whilst it does that.  You can’t delete the filter but you can temporarily disable it via Powershell.

Next up.. the challenges of the Outlook / Exchange model to a Notes / Domino person.

 

 

 

 

 

Deploying The AppDev Pack – An Admins Guide

Over here on the blog is Tim’s next entry talking about Node development and Domino, this time he explains how to use the early release of the app dev package to access (read and write) Domino data via Node.  However I don’t let developers do Domino admin so this is the bit where I explain how to configure Domino.  It’s all very easy and also all still early release so things may well change for GA.

First you will need to request the early release package which you can do here. What you’ll then get is a series of .tgz files including one entitled ‘domino-appdev-docs-site.tgz’ which, once extracted, gives you the index.html with instructions for installing.

You need to bear in mind that at least initially this only runs on Linux and Domino 10 and that Domino 10 on Linux 64bit officially means RHEL 7.4 or higher, or SLES 12. I went with RHEL 7.5.

Next we need to install  “Proton” so it can be run as a Domino server task which just means extracting the file ‘proton-addin.tgz’ into the /opt/ibm/domino/notes/latest/linux directory.   There is also some checking to make sure files are present and setting permissions but I don’t want to repeat the install instructions here as I would rather you refer to the latest official version of those.  Suffice it to say this is a 5 minute job at most.

Once the files are in place you can start and stop Proton as you would any other Domino task by doing “load Proton”, “tell Proton quit”, etc.

Then there are a few notes.ini settings you can choose to set including:

PROTON_SSL
= if you want the traffic between the Proton task and Node server to be encrypted (0/1).

PROTON_LISTEN_PORT= what port you want Proton to listen and be accessed by Node on (default 3002 ).

PROTON_LISTEN_ADDRESS= if you want Proton to listen on a specific address on your Domino server such as 127.0.0.1 which would require Node to be installed locally or 0.0.0.0 which will listen on any available address.

PROTON_AUTHENTICATION= how Proton handles authentication.  There are currently two options, client_cert or anonymous.  With authentication set to anonymous all requests that come from the Node application are done as an “anonymous” Domino user and your Domino application must allow Anonymous rights in the ACL.

The “client_cert” option requires the Node application to present a client certificate to the Proton task and for the Domino administrator to have already mapped that certificate to a specific person document by importing it.  Note that “client_cert” still means that all activity from that Node application will be done as a single identified user that must be in the ACL but does mean you need not allow anonymous access.  You can also use different identities in different Node applications.

Of course, what we all want is OAuth or an authentication model that allows individual user identities and this is hopefully why the product is still considered “early release”.   Both the “anonymous” and “client_cert” models are of limited use in production.

PROTON_KEYFILE
= the keyfile to use if you want PROTON to be communicating using SSL.  This isn’t releated to the Domino keyfile (although it could be) and since this is only for communication between your Node server and your Domino Proton task and never for client-facing traffic you could use entirely internally-generated keys since they only need to be shared with the Node server itself.

HCL have kindly provided scripts to generate all the certificates you need for your testing.

Finally we need to create a design catalog for Proton to use.  You can add individual databases to the design catalog and the first one you add actually creates the catalog.  There must be a catalog with at least one database in it for Proton to work at all.

The catalog contains an index of all the design elements in a Domino database so to add a new database to the catalog you would type:
load updall <database> -e

This isn’t dynamically maintained though, so if you change the design of a database you must update its entry in the catalog if you want to have new design elements added or updated, like this:
load updall <database path> -d

The purpose of the catalog is to speed up DQL’s access to the Domino data.  It’s not required that every database be catalogued but obviously doing so speeds up access and opens up things like view scanning using the <‘View or folder name’>.<Columnname> syntax.

Proton

So that’s my very quick admin guide to what I did that enabled Tim to do what he does. It’s very possible (even probable) that this entire blog will be obsolete when the GA release ships but hopefully this and Tim’s blog help you get started with the early release.

Apple Mojave and IBM Notes 9.0.1

If you have trouble installing Notes 9.0.1 on Mojave with the installer erroring with

“File /Applications/Notes.app/Contents/MacOS/rcp/rcplauncher not found. Provisioning process failed to launch or was terminated before status could be determined.”

a very quick reminder for this error that occured first on the APFS file system using High Sierra – make sure you have downloaded the 9.0.1 installer from March 9th this year (passport advantage code CNQY7EN) and not the original one from 2015.  The one from March will install correctly and then let you install the IF16 fix  (901IF16) from IBM Fix Central that was released on September 24th on top to support Mojave.

If you already had Notes installed prior to upgrading to Mojave the IF16 fix installed on top should just work, this is primarily for new installs.

I would suggest going ahead and get rid of your 2015 9.0.1 client installers and get the new 2018 one in place just to be safe

Adminlicious – My Favourite TCO Features in Domino 10

This is my presentation from Icon UK on Thursday 13th September.  There are lots of TCO features coming in Domino 10 that I’ve been working with and look forward to putting into production.  In this presentation I cover things like cluster symmetry, pre send mail checking, deletion logs and the newrelic statistics reporting.

Say it with me….

28 days until the Domino 10 release.

Ideas, Demos & Your Last Day To Sign Up for Beta 2

So much interesting activity going on around the IBM/HCL products so in case you missed them I thought I could summarise for you.  All are worthy of your time if you care about the future of Domino, Traveler, Verse or Sametime

BETA

Firstly – no time to lose – the registration for Beta 2 of Domino , Notes and Traveler closes TODAY at 12pm EST/5pm GMT.  If you want access to that Beta due this month hopefully then go and sign up here now https://www.ibm.com/blogs/collaboration-solutions/2018/06/11/announcing-ibm-domino-v10-portfolio-beta-program-sign-today/.  Don’t leave it then be disappointed when you don’t get access.

IDEAS

If you have ideas for what you want in Domino, Notes, Traveler, Sametime or anything else – there is a new site (requiring no login) where you can add your ideas and vote on other people’s.  It’s been running for a few weeks and there are some great ideas there already to vote for so it’s a good place to browse during your next coffee break.  Remember the rule – if you don’t ask you don’t get https://domino.ideas.aha.io/ideas

DEMOS

HCL are publishing a series of videos showing how features that are in v10 will behave.  Here are three interesting features announced so far.

Folder Sync v10 #DOMINO10 #DOMINO2025

Next up in “cool admin things coming your way in v10” – folder syncing.  By selecting a folder on a cluster instance you can tell the server to keep that folder in sync across the entire cluster.   The folder can contain database files (NSFs and NTFs) but also NLOs.

Well that’s just dumb Gab.. NLOs are encrypted by the server ID so they can’t be synced across clustermates but a-ha! HCL are way ahead of you.  The NLO sync involves the source server decrypting the NLO before syncing it to the destination where it re-encrypts it before saving.

So no more making sure databases are replicated to every instance in a cluster.  No more creating mass replicas when adding a new server to the cluster or building a new server and no more worrying about missing NLOs if you copy over a DAOS enabled database and not its associated NLO files.

Genius.