DMARC, GDPR & Social Connections

Last week I was at Social Connections in Philadelphia.  The Social Connections team once again put on a great conference around IBM social software and extended this time to include security content.  I presented two sessions – one around security and specifically SMTP DMARC deployment which I am increasingly being asked to deploy..  My second session was about how to approach GDPR as the regulations come into force in less than 1 month. I tried in this session to speak to a US audience who may not be aware in what ways GDPR will impact their business.

Both sessions are shareed below and I hope you find them of interest /use

An Introduction To The DMARC SMTP Validation Requirements
DMARC is a SMTP security standard being increasingly requested by customers to protect against email spoofing. It uses a combination of SPF (Sender Policy Framework) records and DKIM (DomainKeys Identified Mail). Using DMARC you would publicly specify how your outbound mail is sent and the receiving server would verify that the mail it receives matches your requirements. In this session we’ll discuss DMARC deployments and what to do if your mail server (like IBM Domino or SmartCloud) does not yet support DKIM?

How To Approach GDPR Preparation & Discovery
In this session, presented as a workshop outline, we will walk you through your GDPR responsibilities and how to assess your risk. We’ll give some recommendations on high priority but easy to fix issues and how to discover, secure and take ownership of existing data. At the end of the session we will share the workshop outline to help with your own planning.

Champions Expertise – Security

The topic for this month’s Champions Expertise presentations is “Security” so I thought it would be a nice idea to share a few highlights from the presentation I will be giving at Think 2018 in Las Vegas in a few weeks on that subject.  This is “A Guide To Single Sign-On for IBM Collaboration Solutions” and hopefully even this shortened version (6 minutes instead of 40) is of interest.

Of course I also hope to see you at my presentation on Monday 19th March (Mandalay Bay South, Level 2 – Surf B).

 

Creating SHA-2 4096 SSL Certificates for Domino

I’ve been doing a lot of work recently re-creating SSL certificates for customers who have SHA-1 or who want stronger certificates, mostly because so many sites are now failing validation in standard browsers because of SHA-1.  IBM have published several pieces of documentation on how to do this but I wanted to share my bullet list on the quickest and simplest way I have found .  It’s not hard there are just lots of new steps.

Firstly you need to know that SHA-2 support only really started with 9.0.1 FP3.  That means the Domino Admin client you are going to use to do this work must be at that level (yes there are hotfixes for FP2 but go with the latest Fix Pack on your client).

You also need to know that NO Domino 8.5x server will be able to use the keyfile you create, it simply doesn’t have the cryptographic understanding to decode SHA-2.

Finally if you use the CA process to generate internet certificates you will need to upgrade the server running that process to 9.0.1 FP3 too.

Oh and you’re also not going to be using the Domino Server Certificate database to do this at all.

  1. Download 9.0.1 and FP3 for Domino Administrator and upgrade your client. Fix pack 3 is in Fix Central and 9.0.1 is on the IBM download site (CIQ91EN)
  2. Download the latest “lite” version of OpenSSL from here and install it on your Windows machine where you have Domino Administrator running.  I installed it in c:\openssl for example
  3. Download the kyrtool from here and copy the executable to your Notes program directory
  4. Set the environment variable for OpenSSL by typing in a command prompt
    Set OpenSSL_Conf=c:\openssl\bin\openssl.cfg (or whatever your path is)
  5. Now we create our keypair using OpenSSL.  From C:\OpenSSL\bin directory type
    “openssl genrsa -out server.key 4096”
    obviously you can use any name if you don’t want to use server.key and you don’t have to create a 4096 strength keypair.  When finished you should have a file in that directory called server.key
  6. Now you have your keypair you need to create a CSR to send to the certificate authority
    openssl req -new -sha256 -key server.key -out server.csr
    the server.key name must match what you created in step 5 so if you used a different name there you need to use that name here. Similarly your server.csr filename can be anything you like.  When you enter this command be prepared to answer all the questions about the certificate you want generated including the common name etc.  The CSR this generates will be uploaded to your CA (Verisign, GoDaddy, Thawte, whoever) and your SSL certificate created based on the answers you give to those questions.
  7. Now we need to create a keyring file ready to add to certificate into when the CA sends it back.  Go to your Notes program directory and run the kyrtool
    kyrtool  create -k c:\notes\data\keyring.kyr -p <passwordyouwanttouse>
    again the keyring.kyr file can be called anything you like.  Once run you should have both a keyring.kyr and keyring.sth files in your data directory
  8. By now your CA should have sent you your certificate as well as some trusted and intermediate root certificates for their issuer.  We are going to create a single text file that contains the server.key we generated in step 5, the SSL certificate the CA just sent us (usually a .crt or .pem file) and any intermediate or root certificates the CA needs us to use.  Doing this is very simple.  Go to your c:\openssl\bin directory (the one where your server.key file was created) and enter
    type server.key server.crt intermediate.crt root.crt >server.txt
    note all the filenames will be specific to whatever you were sent by your CA.  If you were sent a single bundle then you would use server.key bundlename.crt for instance
  9. To verify your server.txt is created successfully your can validate it using the kyrtool.  Go back to your c:\notes program directory and type
    kyrtool verify <path to server.txt>
  10. Now we import our server.txt will all the certificates into our newly created keyring file we created in step 7
    kyrtool import all -k c:\notes\data\keyring.kyr -i c:\openssl\bin\server.txt
    again your filenames and paths may vary depending on what you chose

And that’s it.  You now have a keyring (kyr) file and stashed password file (sth) you can copy to you Domino 9.x servers and use.  If you want to validate the keys are correctly in the file then you can again use the kyrtool

kyrtool show keys -k c:\notes\data\keyring.kyr  AND

kyrtool show certs -k c:\notes\data\keyring.kyr

IBM’s documentation on the process and the supported platforms is here and here